Accessibility


What can we do to improve universal access to government content online, regardless of device, technology or disability?
One hour dialogue-a-thon Wednesday, September, 28, 2011 at 12:00 pm ET (discussion catalyst Sharron Rush)

Campaign: Accessibility

10 ways to make your website accessbile

Here are a few basic things developers can do that can greatly enhance the accessibility of web applications to people with disabilities. If developers designed ground up with accessibility in mind, it makes for a better experience. • Use Page Headers • Skip Navigation Link • Add Meaningful Alternate Text for Images • Add labels to all form fields • Tables - Mark Up Data Tables correctly • Don't Use Color Solely to ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Mission and Function

The agency web site should lead off with the official Mission and Function Statement. Agencies can then be accessed by key words. This would be helpful because most people do not know what our agencies were created to do. They therefore trek the wilderness to get to the correct one.

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Campaign: Accessibility

Universal Design for Learning

The principles and guidlelines of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) should be applied to Federal website design. UDL will ensure that the broadest range of uses will be able to access and gain knowledge from Federal websites. Universal Design for Learning takes the concept of Universal Design one step further. In addition to focusing on physical accessibility (e.g. text to speech, accessible word or pdf documents) it ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Avoid retrofitting

Too often, agencies treat website accessibility as a “problem” to be solved on an after-the-fact or ad hoc basis. This approach is costly—fixing an inaccessible website is more expensive than designing and maintaining it to be accessible from the beginning and throughout development. This approach is also difficult to maintain—without proper accessibility guidelines and procedures in place, a website that is initially ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Consult disabled users about accessibility

When looking for an accessible web solution, agencies should consult people in the disability community. Specifically, the National Federation of the Blind and other advocacy groups not only represent tens of thousands of disabled people, but organizations like the NFB commonly have specialists on staff who can point an agency in the right direction. In addition, because federal purchasing power spurs the development ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Enforce Accessible Purchasing Rules

Several threads have noted the need for tools that output accessible content. Agencies must find or create workable mechanisms to enforce existing rules for purchasing only accessible products.

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Campaign: Accessibility

Open Community of Practice on Accessibility

There's an enormous amount of skill and experience in the public sector (not just feds) on accessibility. However, these folks are not being encouraged to share what they know in a structured manner. In fact, some information that should be public is being kept private, such as accessibility evaluations of products and services, and even testing protocols. Why not open this thing to the wider public sector? Redundant ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Develop and Use a 'Caption Spider'

Section 508 requires that all agency videos be captioned. Why not build a tool that scours all federal websites, looking for uncaptioned videos? Then notify whoever put it up there to get it captioned ASAP, as well as pointers to captioning tools.

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Campaign: Accessibility

Remove artificial barriers to employment

1. Include street addresses on usajobs so those unwilling or unable to go there don't apply for those jobs. It saves applicant and HR's time. 2. Change Intelligence Community applicaitons to no longer require an entry for each training name, start date, end date, provider, hour provided and same requirements for awards instead of cutting and pasting all training or awards. When requesting accomodation I was told ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Accessibility Focused Dialogue-a-Thon

Greetings all and thanks very much for joining. Thanks especially for your interest in accessibility and universal design. Today’s topic is Universal Access and has to do with ensuring equal access by citizens with disabilities, those in low bandwidth situations, and those who may use older technologies or assistive devices to access federal web sites and applications. I am joined by Jared Smith and Jim Thatcher ...more »

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Campaign: Accessibility

Voice Recognition vs. JAWS - Accessibility Needs of Users

The accessability needs of users are different based on the type of disability. My needs as a person with a repetitive stress injury, who uses voice recognition software, are different than the person with blindness who uses JAWS. I use voice-recognition software, but find that many web sites are not accessible for voice-recognition software. Most web sites seem to be accessible for persons with blindness and/or low ...more »

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