Usability and Design

Access to specific rules

The method of finding specific rules, if you know which one you're looking for, is complicated and counter-intuitive. The search process looks promising, but instead just returns a large mess of results that do not often include the result I'm looking for

Submitted by

Voting

2 votes
Active

Search

Simplification

I think that www.regulations.gov is a great first step at making rulemaking more accessible to the general public. In its current form, however, I think the site and the documents are probably only navigable by people who have above average knowledge about either the agencies or the rulemaking process. I tried to approach the site today as if I were someone who had just heard about a rule, perhaps in passing on the ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

5 votes
Active

Usability and Design

Provide user assistance when a search provides a null result

This is a cut/paste of a search result message (that was buried) on a HealthIT.hhs.gov site: Your Search Results: Showing 1-0 of 0 Products Found First of, it would be impossible to show 1 - 0 products when zero were found. Second, instead of that poorly worded message, government websites search should user plain language to tell them that there search did not yield any results, and should make a suggestion that ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

10 votes
Active

Search

Give choice: Search OR Browse databases

It's frustrating to search with no results repeatedly. Categories and terminology are often arbitrary, so it would remove a barrier to allow simple browsing.

Submitted by

Voting

8 votes
Active

Usability and Design

improve search functions for past discussions

In trying to understand a debate on a certain issue, I would find it helpful if there was a easier/clearer way to access the past debate. So far, all I find are a long list of hits with technical names, it is hard to distinguish what is an agency document, a "docket", a public submission (why not call them comments?), etc.

Submitted by

Voting

4 votes
Active

Content and Readability

Easy to make repairs

In studying the usability of websites by under-educated individuals we have found that the site has to make it easy for a user to make repairs - correct themselves when they wind up somewhere they didn't want to be.

Repair skills of a user have to be matched with linguistic tools, visual and navigation aids that help in this process.

Submitted by

Voting

3 votes
Active

Search

Search Becomes Strategic - Tied to User Experience

With the recent changes at Google, fixing the search functionality for .gov websites becomes more closely tied to the user experience. This means bringing in user experience professionals who have deep knowledge/expertise in search technology (that powers the site search for these sites) OR search professionals who has a strong background in user experience and information architecture. All too often, designing a successful ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

9 votes
Active

Search

Speed

Institute best practices for speed (cache pages, use CDNs and so on) so that content loads quickly on any device with any connection.

Submitted by

Voting

13 votes
Active

Usability and Design

Web Help

If someone is searching for something, and gets redirected, this sometimes it becomes and endless circle of disappointment.

Maybe after 5 bad search results you could set up an answer box where someone could write a discription of what they want to find, send a message, and get an e-mail response to thier problem.

Submitted by

Voting

1 vote
Active

Policies and Principles

Make all US Bills, Regulations, and Court Decisions searchable

Make all US Bills, Regulations, and Court Decisions searchable from one location, using one search form, searchable on title, content, and tags. Currently it seems that each dept implements their own bizarre little incompatible data base, with its own bizarre incompatible search form and criteria. And the court system is the worse offenders of all!

Submitted by

Voting

31 votes
Active

Search

Index Website

Create a website with simple html text such as that used in www.craigslist.org that subdivides all the ".gov" websites into one page. For example all the science category such as NASA, NSF, NOAA, DARPA, and others would be under one section. Knowing what the federal government provides and where to find is important and should be easily accessible. One example that comes to mind is the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS.gov) ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

21 votes
Active

Content and Readability

Mobile Web - Natural Language and AI

The projections are that over 50% of population will primarily be accessing the web on mobile devices -- NOT tablets, but, smaller screen phones. Government sites are information heavy, creating dense text or complex navigation -- both of which are highly problematic on small screens. The solution is using conversational AI engines and natural language processing specifically tailored for "conversational mobile" engagement. ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

4 votes
Active