Accessibility


What can we do to improve universal access to government content online, regardless of device, technology or disability?
One hour dialogue-a-thon Wednesday, September, 28, 2011 at 12:00 pm ET (discussion catalyst Sharron Rush)

Campaign: Accessibility

Train web developers beyond Section 508

Some of the most important accessibility best practices are not required by Section 508. Logically ordered heading tags for example, or links with clear purpose (instead of "click here", "Read our August 2011 Newsletter"). It seems everyone simply adds ALT attributes to images and calls it a day. We need to train web developers and designers in more than basic Section 508 and ensure they understand accessibility beyond ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

60 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

HTML5 and Semantic Content

Use semantic content and markup so that relevant content is easily found through search engines. Allow content managers to easily tag content for SEO, so that people can find the relevant information that are looking for.

 

Harness HTML5 in forms and use micro-formats when applicable. This would greatly improve the the experience for the growing amount of users on mobile devices.

Submitted by

Voting

57 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

efficiency, jobs & QA: accessibility funding for dedicated staff

Trying to train everyone on the finer points of 508 and related accessibility is inefficient and a losing proposition. Take all of the money spent on 508 training and repurpose it to hire dedicated, experienced experts to help with publishing and accessibility compliance. Agencies should receive funding for centralized, dedicated staff that have time and skills to review and publish web, print, video, etc. and make ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

23 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Enforce Accessible Purchasing Rules

Several threads have noted the need for tools that output accessible content. Agencies must find or create workable mechanisms to enforce existing rules for purchasing only accessible products.

Submitted by

Voting

18 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Increase access and ease of use.

Increasing ease of use and accessibility would be ideal. Going to a .gov website to discover that you have to not only use a certain browser, but that that browser can only be found on one operating system is a horrible waste. .gov websites built according to web standards would be a huge help towards accessibility as well.

Submitted by

Voting

16 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Accessibility of non-.Gov/.Mil sites

There are a large number of Federal Agencies that use .ORG or even .COM sites for a number of reasons. Whenever sites are being designed or managed, Section 508 and Accessibility should be mandated by the agency for these sites as well. Conformance reporting should include all of an agency's sites, not just the public facing .gov/.mil sites.

Submitted by

Voting

14 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Hurricane Center should have easier data accessibility

I see no standard in how the NHC organizes their data via XML. There should be 1(ONE) XML file one can go to and grab forecast coordinates, current storms, and tropical waves. The wallet XML files are fine but a combined XML of all live data would be better. There are too many hops one must do to get current data via XML

Submitted by

Voting

12 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Voice Recognition vs. JAWS - Accessibility Needs of Users

The accessability needs of users are different based on the type of disability. My needs as a person with a repetitive stress injury, who uses voice recognition software, are different than the person with blindness who uses JAWS. I use voice-recognition software, but find that many web sites are not accessible for voice-recognition software. Most web sites seem to be accessible for persons with blindness and/or low ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

12 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Establish Mechanisms to Allow for Virtual Advisory Boards

Receiving ongoing feedback from key stakeholder communities, in a transparent manner, could significantly improve the quality of the content. For example, more systematized, direct engagement with disabled users could help not only improve compliance but actually address the more fundamental issue of usability. This approach could be used for other issues including Low English Proficiency/ Multilingual content and the ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

11 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Disabilities should be separated and no lumped together

Access available at places like The Smithsonian is irrelevant if visitors are not aware of it. The appropriate symbols (e.g. assistive listening devices, captioning, American Sign Language interpretation) and information should be listed consistently in the same format on each website across all federal agencies. Not having a consistent format leads to information not being posted, accurate and potentially using politically ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

8 votes
Active

Campaign: Accessibility

Open Community of Practice on Accessibility

There's an enormous amount of skill and experience in the public sector (not just feds) on accessibility. However, these folks are not being encouraged to share what they know in a structured manner. In fact, some information that should be public is being kept private, such as accessibility evaluations of products and services, and even testing protocols. Why not open this thing to the wider public sector? Redundant ...more »

Submitted by

Voting

7 votes
Active