Policies and Principles

Add the ability to flag a web page for outdated, incorrectness.

Give the users the ability to flag a page for a broken link, missing content, outdated or incorrect content. This would actually help government keep their web pages updated instead of relying on link-checkers. These flags for outdated or incorrect content could be a metric that agencies use to measure quality. Additionally it could help agencies implement this Executive Order--Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving ...more »

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Policies and Principles

Require a content review process

We have a boatload of govt info on govt websites. How often do you review it to make sure it's still current and accurate? How do you know it's still current and accurate? When I was at HUD, we started a quarterly certification program. In a nutshell, the Deputy Secretary required every principal staff member (asst secys) to certify - in writing - that all the content for which his/her organization was responsible ...more »

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Accessibility

Consult disabled users about accessibility

When looking for an accessible web solution, agencies should consult people in the disability community. Specifically, the National Federation of the Blind and other advocacy groups not only represent tens of thousands of disabled people, but organizations like the NFB commonly have specialists on staff who can point an agency in the right direction. In addition, because federal purchasing power spurs the development ...more »

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Policies and Principles

OptIn works for me

The Metro, here in Portland, Oregon uses something called "OptIn" to get opinions from the citizens on all sorts of things. I find it invigorating to know that I am finally being listened to by my government.

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