Content and Readability

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Plain language on government websites

Too much of the information on federal websites is poorly written and is too complex, especially for the web. Content managers need to pay more attention to the clarity of information. Most federal web content is covered by the Plain Writing Act of 2010, but transforming federal material into plain language will be a major challenge, especially since the underlying paper-based information is poorly written.

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225 votes
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Content and Readability

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content

Eliminate the endless page downs through paragraphs, lines and linked URLs that were common web page designs from the early 1990s. These are neither user-friendly nor engaging and serve to bury information for all but the most intrepid.

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16 votes
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Content and Readability

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Keep it simple

The value of a web site is not only its content but in ease of accessibility and movement throughout the site. There is nothing more frustrating than to maneuver unsuccessfully and waste precious time in the process.

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12 votes
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Policies and Principles

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Sentence Structure

The grammar of web language differs greatly from the grammar and style of print. We expect to read shorter sentences, not necessarily all full sentences. Importing print-based sentence structures into a website, especially for key orientation pages and links defeats the point of using a website to build and convey information.

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9 votes
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